Positive Music Place

Posts Tagged ‘music’

Citizen Kitten at Three Clubs

Posted by dlockeretz on March 20, 2017

Jazz may have an uphill climb these days, but Citizen Kitten is willing to put in the legwork. The Los Angeles jazz quartet made their debut at Hollywood’s Three Clubs on Sunday, March 19th, 2017 and delivered a show that was as entertaining as it was musically accomplished.

Today’s jazz musicians face a bit of a catch-22: if you put in the time to study, practice and gig your way to excellence, it’s hard to not take yourself at least a little bit seriously for your efforts, but when audiences have more and more choices for entertainment – live or in home – they don’t want to spend money or time hearing someone blowing their own horn (excuse the pun). We’ve all seen the meme showing how the performance is the tip of the iceberg compared to the rehearsals, but most audiences don’t care about how much time musicians have put into their art anymore than most musicians care about how many thankless hours the average corporate drone has to log. In a nutshell, a successful jazz (or any other style, really) performer has to put in the work and still make it look fun.

How does Citizen Kitten tackle this dilemma? The “kitten” of the band is singer Amanda Achen, a twentysomething who moved effortlessly from jazz standards to Broadway to Beck to Zeppelin to Gnarls Barkley, commanding the stage at a rare level. She also managed to seem approachable in a way that not all jazz singers are. During a sultry rendition of “Misty” she couldn’t help but smirk as she sang the line “Helpless as a kitten up a tree.” Her “What Lola Wants” was, inevitably, seductive, but she didn’t overplay the temptress role; she strode up to an audience member in the front row and said, “I like your shirt” without missing a beat. Add this to a rocking version of the Beatles’ “Oh! Darling”, an odd-time “50 Ways to Leave Your Lover” and a genre-exploring rendition of “It Don’t Mean A Thing” and she put in a full night’s work.

Backing Achen was bassist Jon Lee Keenan, guitarist Matt Berger and drummer Paul Tavenner, all of whom expertly navigated the multiple changes of groove and tempo. Berger felt equally at home using dissonant chord voicings on a jazz arrangement of “Black Dog” as he did taking his microphone stand and playing slide guitar with it on a ripping solo in the same song. Keenan’s electric upright bass had the woody, full sound of an acoustic but allowed him more room to explore with both the grooves and solos than would have a traditional instrument. Tavenner provided a framework for the others from behind the kit, running the gamut from the torch songs to the rockers, giving the funkier numbers an old-school feel with brushes and pulling no punches with the cymbals when things needed to get loud.

In the midst of their innovation, some of Citizen Kitten’s standards felt a little familiar. They have shown an ability to turn songs on their head without making it seem like a gimmick; it will be interesting to see how they continue to develop tunes such as “One Note Samba”, “Cheek to Cheek” and “If I Were A Bell.” Over time, the skill and chemistry of these musicians will lead to the pace of their comic interplay between songs will tighten up while remaining organic. If it seems like I’m nit-picking a debut performance from a band that’s only been together for a few months, maybe it’s just my own envy sneaking through – I’ve been in bands that have worked for years without ever reaching this level. These guys are great and will only get better.

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Book review: “The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto” by Mitch Albom

Posted by dlockeretz on March 9, 2017

Mitch Albom was a musician before he was a writer. When his dreams of rock’n’roll stardom seemed destined to not come true, he switched to journalism. Even as he found success with “Tuesdays with Morrie” and a series of well-received novels, he continued to seek musical outlets by becoming a member of Rock Bottom Remainders (a part-time rock band of authors including Dave Barry, Stephen King and Amy Tan) and by writing “The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto”.

The narrator of “Strings” is Music. If this idea sounds a little weighty, it’s because it is. Albom, however, manages to make Music an engaging storyteller. Also helping is that Music paces its story well by allowing other characters – some real (Tony Bennett, Wynton Marsalis, Paul Stanley) and others fictitious but based on archetypes (female Brill Building songwriter; pop music historian; Jewish manager) to share reminiscences of Frankie Presto, a virtuoso guitarist and singer whose death and memorial service frame the novel. Thus, while Music provides the ongoing thread of the story, the reader is given different perspectives about Presto by those who knew him at different stages of his life: drifting teenager, rising idol, fading star, disillusioned journeyman, reclusive but legendary teacher.

At first glance, “Strings” follows the familiar story line of the young, hungry artist who is lured by fame and fortune and loses their way. At one point, Music says, “I have been on earth since mankind’s inception and have produced sounds…that involve awakening, love, pain and the four seasons. But in my countless creations, there has never been a sound for ‘career.’ Why do you let it affect me so?” Despite this, Albom doesn’t necessarily want us to hate the music business and what it did to Frankie Presto. He understands that people lose their way and have to find themselves: Frankie makes mistakes and unlike some, he is fortunate enough to live to learn from them. A broad brush interpretation of “Strings” might conclude that with music, as with anything, one must take the bad (the business side) with the good (the art).

Indeed, taking the bad with the good sums up the reader’s experience with “The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto.” Despite a few hard-to-believe plot twists that don’t add much to the story, an excess of one-sentence paragraphs and some forced music-related similes (is it really necessary for smoke from a gun to take “the shape of a music rest?” or to refer to Frankie Presto’s lifetime love affair with the free-spirited British girl Aurora as a “symphony”?) Albom’s obvious love of music of all genres keeps the pages turning. He pays tribute to classical guitarists Francisco Tarrega and Andres Segovia to Duke Ellington, Hank Williams, Elvis, Lyle Lovett, Ingrid Michaelson and almost everyone in between.

A common critique of this book is that one has to be a musician to enjoy it. To that, all I can say is that the book was given to me by a non-musician friend and came highly recommended. If you have no interest in music, this book is not for you, but even those who have never plodded through hours of scales and arpeggios or broken down a P.A. system in a dive bar at two in the morning will be able to enjoy and relate to much of the story.

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CD Review: Hilton Ruiz, “Strut”

Posted by dlockeretz on October 28, 2015

Note: This CD review is a companion to D Theory #98.

In the fall of 1990, my sophomore year in high school, I came across a CD at the library whose cover, for some strange reason, caught my attention.

Hilton Ruiz's record Figuring that if the music was one tenth as exciting as the image, I checked it out and scurried home to listen to it. It took perhaps ten seconds of the funky groove of the band’s cover of Lee Morgan’s classic, “The Sidewinder”, to get me hooked. Unlikely as it seemed, I was so enthralled by the music that I almost immediately forgot about the album cover. Not only did I love the record but it inspired me to dig further into jazz. Almost immediately I went from feeling awkward and uncomfortable with the style to a full-fledged jazz snob.

Despite the impact the record had on my life, it slowly vanished from my playlist. Over the next quarter century I started listening to music for pure enjoyment less and less, although I never fully forgot this record. Lately I found myself curious to see if it would stand up to my memory. I bought a copy on eBay (it’s also available at Amazon). Would the same record that appealed to a hormonal teenager trying to make sense of jazz resonate with a 40-year old journeyman? As the late Mr. Ruiz might have said: Sí, señor.

Powered by Ruiz’s exciting piano, a tight horn section and a rhythm section that, while sometimes busier than necessary, never lets up on the energy, this diverse collection of tunes amounts to that all-too-elusive beast: ear candy with staying power. The rocking “Sidewinder” allows each band member to introduce themselves in an hot update of Morgan’s hip ’60s track. Saxophonist Sam Rivers contributed “Bluz”, an angular be-bop melody set over a smoldering Latin groove. Two mid tempo compositions by William Allen (not a band member, perhaps a friend of Ruiz’s?) – “Soca Serenade” and “Aged in Soul” – mix up the feel, both featuring the horn section.

The two longest pieces – trombonist Dick Griffin’s “All My Love Is Yours” and the only Ruiz original, “Goin’ Back to New Orleans” at eight and almost eleven minutes respectively – wear out their welcomes. Both have fun, uptempo grooves and nice interplay between the horns but could have been trimmed to five or six minutes; one doesn’t see the development that might be expected in compositions of that length. The two ballads on the record – the short, lounge-y “Why Don’t You Steal My Blues” and dramatic solo rendition of Strayhorn’s “Lush Life” – are the final two tracks, which seems an odd choice of sequencing. Even if one were to read the 2 1/2 minute “Blues” as a prelude to “Lush Life” ending a high energy record with a ballad is anti-climatic. Thus, when listening to the record start to finish (yeah, I know, I’m old) one is left with the impression that the sum of the parts are greater than the whole.

Nevertheless, reconnecting with “Strut” has been an enjoyable experience for me. The record has long been out of print and sadly, Hilton Ruiz left us far too soon in 2006, at the age of 54. Thankfully, the music lives on and will hopefully create new generations of jazz geeks in the years to come.

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Escape artists

Posted by dlockeretz on May 19, 2015

Note: this is a simulblog, appearing both on “D-Theory” and “Positive Music Place.”

When one of my friends posted her concerns that the internet would spoil the finale of “Mad Men” before she had a chance to watch it, I reassured her in my typically smart-ass manner: “Already saw it. Vader is Luke’s father.”

My knowledge of “Mad Men” consists of having watched about 10 minutes of it and listening to people praise it. The show has helped me see that just because something is popular, that doesn’t make it bad. I get the show’s appeal: timeless themes of pride undone by a tragic flaw set against a glamorous ’60s backdrop is a winning combination. I’ve realized that the problem is not Don Draper; it’s another “D”. My tastes in TV are escapist (see D-Theory posts #44 and #84 for more info). Thus, if I don’t want to be judged for favoring lighter entertainment when it comes to the tube, I shouldn’t judge those who prefer Adele to Mahler.

A few days ago I was listening to a popular country song that was the requested first dance at a wedding where I was performing with the 40-Oz. Band. Overhearing it, my wife gave me a look that needed no explanation. All I could do was tell her, “Not everyone wants to be challenged on their wedding day.” Similarly, not everyone wants to be challenged after a long day at the office.

Like all creative professionals, us musicians put so much work and heart into what we do that when someone doesn’t notice, it’s a hard pill to swallow. We shake our heads when people download Nicki Minaj tracks by the millions while our heart-felt oeuvre, honed by the light of a midnight lamp, is met with indifference at Open Mic night.

Yet we ignore, too: whether it’s by eating fast food instead of going to the farmer’s market; by reading “Twilight” instead of Shakespeare or by watching “The League” and “Shipping Wars” instead of “Mad Man.” That doesn’t make us bad people; everyone needs convenience and escapes now and then. Most dieticians agree that you can’t expect yourself to eat perfectly 24/7. Play for the people who want the challenge, don’t let the ones who don’t bring you down and step outside your own comfort zone now and then. You may pleasantly surprise a writer, chef, candle maker or photographer who assumed you were just looking for an escape.

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CD Review: Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers, “Rare Bird Alert”

Posted by dlockeretz on March 6, 2015

Listening to “Rare Bird Alert” is kind of like having dinner with a favorite uncle whom you haven’t seen for ages. You laugh, joke, perhaps debate and argue a little, perhaps reminisce about those who are no longer around. You leave with a lighter step, thinking, “Man, I forgot how much fun that could be!” At the same time, some of the truths your uncle laid upon you–not in a heavy handed manner but just by way of sharing his experiences–resonate with you for some time after. You always enjoyed your uncle but as an adult, you appreciate his wisdom more than when you were younger.

Every actor has made an album, or at least so it seems. Martin however has been somewhat out of the limelight for the last few years, making his musical career seem like less of a gimmick. More importantly he actually has the talent to pull it off. The songs are innovative but also infused with tradition, stepping out of the box without being overly obvious about it. A good example is on the opening track (also the title track), an instrumental in which Martin uses silence in a way that is uncommon in bluegrass but works well with the tune (addition by subtraction, if you will.) Another strong instrumental is “The Great Remember” in which Martin’s banjo is melodic, almost lyrical. While Bela Fleck has been known for banjo virtuosity in almost every style of music known to man, Martin manages to make it sound prettier than one could imagine.

Most of the tracks are vocal however and we are treated to quite the variety of singers. Leading off is none other than Sir Paul, although “Best Love” is a somewhat pedestrian vehicle for him. The close harmonies of the Dixie Chicks bring the heart song “You” to life. Martin’s own Steep Canyon Rangers turn in impressive vocal performances as well. The most technically demanding–and arguably most humorous–song on the record is “Atheists Don’t Have No Songs”, an a capella number with several smoothly executed modulations. The Rangers’ humor and skill are also evident on “Women Like to Slow Dance” and “Jubilation Day.” The record also features a live version of Martin’s classic hit “King Tut”, this time in a fully bluegrass rendition.

There is no dead weight on the record, although a few are relatively weak. “Go Away, Stop, Turn Around, Come Back” and “Yellow Backed Fly” are both entertaining and cute but not particularly memorable. Nevertheless, it’s that all-too-uncommon record (a true “rare bird” if you will) that is enjoyable to listen to in its entirety; even the songs that don’t stand out work well enough to not skip. Not every story that your uncle spins is a masterpiece; occasionally Aunt Mildred’s roast might be a little dry. Their hospitality, however, is hard to beat and few people who spend an evening there regret it. There are far worse ways to spend 40 minutes or so than with this collection of songs from Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers.

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“You had all year”

Posted by dlockeretz on January 28, 2015

Is it OK to musicians to play for free at nonprofit events such as school fundraisers and AIDS walks?

Sure it is, as long as the charity/nonprofit organization in question doesn’t pay a cent for anything else. That’s right: if the city where the event is held, the caterers, the security, the administrative staff, photographers and other vendors associated with the event don’t make any money, I’ll happily go without as well.

Musicians are often expected to play at weddings, clubs and offices for “exposure”, “karma”, “food” and more substitutes for money. But aren’t nonprofits different?

Nope. Whether it’s a corporate party, a wedding or a fundraiser is immaterial; the principle is the same. If they have money for a venue and food, they have money for music.

At NAMM, I attended a workshop on advice for artists seeking endorsement deals. The panel included Mike Johnson, known for his extensive online library of drum lessons, his work with Simon Says and Filter and for the purposes of his appearance at this workshop, his endorsements. “NAMM is not the place to get an endorsement deal,” he told the audience. “You had all year.”

You had all year.

No budget for musicians? Sorry, you had all year. How much does the band that you want cost? Get a quote, sock aside the cash and pay the fee or settle for less.

As a musician, there’s nothing wrong with saying that to event organizers who don’t want to pay. Do our landlords, car title holders and cell phone companies care that we can’t come up the money because we were helping out a nonprofit and turning down paying gigs? Don’t we have to budget extra for tax season, which comes at the end of what is usually the leanest time of the year for musicians? (Speaking of taxes, if I wanted to be a smartass, I’d point out that in the case of schools, you already contribute to them; churches and other nonprofits are usually tax exempt. But this is the Positive Music Place so I’ll try to keep it civil.)

Look, I have nothing against nonprofit organizations; they just don’t get a special pass. There are other ways to donate to organizations in which you truly believe. Volunteer to perform at a nursing home. Busk on the sidewalk and give the money to the local food bank. Offer to do a presentation at a school. Maybe even give a little discount to someone who wants you to play at a fundraiser. But when someone seeks you out requesting you contribute to their cause–no matter how altruistic–yet claims no budget, just give them a friendly reminder:

“You had all year.”

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Steely Dan at Coachella – crazy enough to work?

Posted by dlockeretz on January 10, 2015

There are three likely responses to Steely Dan’s announced appearance at this year’s Coachella festival: “Wow!” “Why?” or “Who?” In this post, we will focus on the second.

I’ll admit it’s hard for me to be objective about Steely Dan, my favorite musical act of all time. I do know this: not everyone shares my love of them. I wish I could play the “That’s OK, it’s just over your heads/you have to be a musician to appreciate them” card but many musician friends of mine whose opinions I respect were either never fans or have found that “The Dan” has run their course. I’ll admit too that most of their recent output, including lead singer/keyboardist Donald Fagen’s post-“Nightfly” solo records, has the feel of going to dinner with your ex and holding out hope that the fire is still alive but, despite a few shared laughs and good memories, ultimately being disappointed.

That said, I will now try to unravel the million dollar question: what the hell is Steely Dan doing playing Coachella? Is it anything but a recipe for disaster?

Maybe, just maybe. It’s a longshot, like an ailing Kirk Gibson coming to bat against flame-throwing Dennis Eckersley with Game 1 of the 1988 World Series on the line (Christ, I need to stop dating myself) or Mercury records producer Charlie Fach insisting that the Bachman Turner Overdrive record a song they’d written as a joke, entitled “You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet” (that’s more like it.)

What can make this dark horse a contender?

The healing power of irony will be a factor. Hipsters and millenials love to be ironic and so does Steely Dan; they’ve been called Brooklyn’s first hipster band. Many bands have songs about someone catching their partner in bed with someone else, but only Steely Dan’s “Everything You Did” features a protagonist who asks is girlfriend to do the same things to him that he saw her doing to his rival. As Fagen said in 1993, “I’m into my post-irony phase, which includes irony as well.” Who knows; perhaps while savoring the irony that they are listening to the same music their parents and perhaps grandparents grew up on, young Coachella attendees may find their voice in a band with so many obscure references that an online dictionary has been established to sort them all out.

There are non-ironic reasons why this might work too. An LA Weekly article claims, “Your favorite rock/pop/electronic/hip-hop act? Likely influenced by the Dan.” De La Soul sampled “Peg” and MF Doom sampled “Black Cow” and they probably weren’t being ironic.

Lastly, at the risk of sounding reactionary, is classic rock entirely dead? There was enough outrage at Kanye West’s fans not recognizing this Paul McCartney character with whom he recently collaborated to make me feel that yes, humanity still has hope. It took seven Super Bowl half-time shows of classic rock artists such as Springsteen and West’s protege Paul McCartney in the years following the Janet Jackson incident before  we grew tired of it and got the Black Eyed Peas instead; even then not everyone thought that the event was better for it. With the right packaging, everything old becomes new again. Ten years ago, “Guitar Hero” got kids listening to the Allman Brothers. Who knows, maybe Steely Dan’s appearance at Coachella will have hipsters putting down their artisan Old Fashioneds and doing shots of Cuervo Gold.

As for the haters? While acknowledging that the following argument can be used against me vis-a-vis my opinion of Coldplay, I put forth the notion that to attract haters, a band has to be at least somewhat known. After all, the writers of “Knocked Up” could have chosen any band when they had Seth Rogen say, “That’s because Steely Dan gargles my balls.”

Sometimes on the day after too many beers and pizza, I’ll be getting dressed and look the pants I’m about to put on and feel as if I’m diving into a tiny pool from a high board. I have to admit that I feel a similar vibe about Steely Dan at Coachella. That said, I’m cautiously optimistic; if the main argument against Steely Dan’s appearance is the band’s irrelevancy, you could say that they have nothing to lose. We’ll know in three months. For now, I leave you with the words of the good folks at Funny or Die: “They’ve had way more sex than you’ll ever have.”

 

 

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An open letter to a talent buyer who didn’t want to pay my fee

Posted by dlockeretz on September 11, 2014

Dear Ms. _____,

I’m sorry that the 10th St. Jazz Quartet was not able to fit your budget. I understand that in the planning of a major event, budget is a concern. You are correct that there are many more economical options available to you, such as DJs or student ensembles that are willing to charge far less for their services. In many cases, these can be viable choices and I am sure that you be able to find a satisfactory entertainment solution that will fit your budget.

I would also like to respectfully suggest that during future events, you consider allocating extra funds in the event budget for premium live entertainment. To be sure, in many situations the quality of the musical entertainment does not make an immediately noticeable difference, just as if you were attending a friend’s dinner party, it wouldn’t be readily obvious if the dining room table was made from solid oak or from composite. For many people, purchasing a Rolex instead of a Timex is an unaffordable frivolity.

Nevertheless, there are reasons to spend extra money for quality, even on something which, unlike the glassware, chairs or decorations, might well go unnoticed by most of the guests. As veteran musicians we are aware that often times at cocktail hours, the less the music is noticed, the more effectively it has served its purpose. That being said, just as a great chef can expertly season or prepare a dish without calling too much attention to their technique, top-level jazz musicians can enhance the atmosphere of a special evening. Though they might not immediately associate their response with the music at the event, quality entertainment is likely to contribute to your guests’ overall impression about your brand.

We hope that you are able to find an entertainment solution within your budget for your event on the 28th. Please feel free to consider the 10th St. Jazz Quartet for future occasions. Thank you for your time and your consideration and best of luck.

Sincerely,

David Lockeretz

PS – While we are not familiar with the music of “Jon Coltran”, as requested by your associate, we would be happy to play music by the great John Coltrane should you require our services at a later date.

 

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The restaurant time forgot (and what musicians can learn from it)

Posted by dlockeretz on July 14, 2014

Note: this is a simulblog, posted on both D-Theory and Positive Music Place.

The story sounds familiar: a restaurant consistently received bad reviews, so they looked over surveillance videos to see what’s going on.  The plot twist came when management looked over the film.  The results were surprising–not because they were shocking, but just the opposite.  There were no bodily functions performed on the prime rib; no one playing Words with Friends as a grease fire broke out; no managers putting the make on waitresses in the office; none of the employee hijinks that might be expected.  In fact, when they compared the recent footage to tapes from ten years earlier, the employee behavior was pretty much the same.  It was the customers that were different.

According the article about this restaurant’s findings, seven out of the 45 customers observed on the recent video asked their servers for the Wifi password.  Twenty-seven of the 45 requested that their waiter take a picture of their group; 14 of those 27 asked for a second picture.  Long story short: the restaurant’s conclusion was that customer behavior increased the average length of stay by 50 minutes compared to ten years ago.

Here’s where the restaurant missed the mark.  “We are grateful for everyone who comes into our restaurant, after all there are so many choices out there.  But you please be a little more considerate?” they implore at the end of the article.

The problem is, the restaurant doesn’t accept the fact that–whether or not they agree with it–for many customers, the cell phone is as important a part of the meal as the locally sourced vegetables and the craft beers.  The restaurant customer of 2014 expects to be able to take photos of their food and themselves enjoying it.  Savvy restauranteurs embrace the free advertising and integrate cell phones into the dining experience they provide;  proprietors stuck in the past complain about how kids today have no manners instead of trying to figure out how to better cater to them, thus resulting in poor online reviews.

So far you’ve read over 300 of my words (which I appreciate, thank you!); none of which is “music.”  What does this restaurant and their grievances with cell phones have to do with music?

Musicians face a similar dilemma in terms of getting their product out to new audiences.  Yes, we all want to do it our way, but trends, buying habits and tastes change.  Many consumers expect to be able to get music for free.  Music fans often see Facebook, Instagram and Twitter as ways of connecting with their favorite bands.  (Check out this post on CD Baby’s DIY Musician blog for more thoughts on the subject.)  The musician who evolves to fit the needs of  2014′s audience will likely have more gigs than the one who shakes his fist and rants about how no one appreciates AC/DC, Zeppelin or Sabbath anymore (the fact that I am writing this blog instead of playing a show might give a hint about the category in which I belong).

Elitism can have its place.  Fattburger’s slogan is “We’re not for everyone”; the Stone Brewing Company Arrogant Bastard’s bottle reads, “You’re not worthy.”  Businesses sometimes have funny have signs mocking Wifi obsessiveness.  Similarly, the independent musician who doggedly sticks to their guns and refuses to cave in to any trends, technological or otherwise, sometimes succeeds.  Let’s be honest though; these are usually the exception, not the rule.

I don’t claim to have much experience in the food service business (unless you count the lemonade stand my brother and I had as kids) but I do know this: the restaurant’s choices are to either to brand themselves as a cell-phone free zone (a move which may make their following smaller but more loyal) or adapt to changing times and train waiters to accept taking pictures of drunken customers as part of their job description.

Today’s consumer typically has more options for night life, dining and entertainment than they do time or money; as a band, restaurant or other purveyor of goods and services, you have a lot of competition for customers/fans.  If you look down on Wifi use at your restaurant, customers will likely go to the place down the block where it’s embraced.

Let’s face it, time can be a harsh mistress.  Yesterday’s rock star is today’s grumpy old man telling kids to get off their lawn.  Today’s rock stars–culinary, musical or otherwise–are often ones that let people on their lawn, but charge extra for Wifi.

free-wifi-geek-ashole-1026106

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Rock Spider!

Posted by dlockeretz on June 11, 2014

There’s a new kind of music on the Web, but it’s not available on Spotify, Pandora or Youtube.  It’s not the World Wide Web we’re talking about either.

Music is the universal language, transcending not only culture and time, but sometimes even species.  Whales utilize songs to communicate; Peter Gabriel has taught a chimpanzee how to play the piano.  Now we have anther example of music used by a different species – the spider.

According to an NPR story, spiders tune the strands of their web, tightening and loosening them as one would a guitar.   Just as a guitarist knows (well, hopefully they do) when their string is in tune, so too a spider can instinctively tell if a thread is at the right tension and adjust it accordingly.  They can read the vibrations created when a fly hits the web, thus enabling them to locate prey.  They can also tell if the vibration is caused by a potential mate’s entrance, proving that humans aren’t the only species that can use music as a way of getting lucky.

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