Positive Music Place

Archive for March, 2018

Why It Works #1: “Most People Are Good”

Posted by dlockeretz on March 6, 2018

This is the inaugural post in a series in which I will listen closely to a song that I don’t like and try to get underneath it and figure out why it’s on the radio and my music isn’t. Why am I writing about music I don’t like on a blog called “Positive Music Place?” I hope to accomplish four things: One, to attempt to understand the perspective and opinions of others – something at which I haven’t always excelled. Two, to study examples of success in the music business. It’s easy to study what I enjoy; I’m hoping that studying what I don’t enjoy will make me better rounded. Three, to at least be able to articulate what it is I don’t like about a song, to be specific about why it doesn’t move me, rather than to simply shake my fist like a grumpy old man. I’ll admit that I’ve relied on the “if it’s popular, it’s wrong” crutch far too often and I want to break away from that. Lastly, perhaps going through this process will inspire me to take my own music off the back burner.

Without further ado, let’s analyze:

“MOST PEOPLE ARE GOOD”

Artist: Luke Bryan

Songwriters: Josh Kear, David Frasier, Ed Hill

WHAT I DON’T LIKE

Author Seth Godin once said, “Safe is risky.” By that measure, Messrs. Kear, Frasier and Hill have taken a gamble that has paid off. It doesn’t get much safer than “Most People Are Good.” Who wouldn’t like a song that is basically a series of quotable platitudes? “Every breath’s a gift, the first one to the last.” “Kids should be kids as long as they can/turn off the screen, go climb a tree, get dirt on their hands.” And of course, “Mamas ought to qualify for sainthood.” No, not everything has to be doom and gloom, but the feel-good of “Most People Are Good” comes too easily. It’s all telling, no showing. It’s a laundry list of Hallmark quotations with no development. The lyrics of the choruses are all the same; any of the six couplets in the first two verses are interchangeable. Even the words “I believe you love who you love/ain’t nothing you should ever be ashamed of” are not as risky as they seem. Sure, some Bryan Bros who are able to read between the lines will get pissed off, but with country music now more mainstream than ever, saying “See, we’re not all backwards hicks!” at the risk of pissing off a few rednecks is a sound trade off.

WHY IT WORKS

According to the “Taste of Country” website, Josh Kear wanted to create something positive following the acrimonious 2016 presidential campaign. The idea of a songwriter trying to rally the masses with an inspiring message in difficult times is not new. Irving Berlin wrote “God Bless America” while serving during World War I and revised it before World War II. Bruce Springsteen wrote “The Rising” in response to 9/11. Will “Most People Are Good” hold up in years to come and be a beacon of light for future generations? If you ask Kyle “The Triggerman” Coroneos of Saving Country Music, it just might. Coroneos points to the “love who you love” lyric in particular: “Luke Bryan isn’t coming out for gay or interracial marriage here necessarily. He’s just simply saying, ‘Hey, if two people love each other, who gives a damn? Good for them. None of my business.’ And it’s these types of messages served in a simple, nuanced, and respectful manner that actually help cause the slow eroding of prejudices most all rational and cultured people agree should be put in humankind’s past.” Of the song’s non-combative nature, he writes, “You don’t change the world through music by singing polarizing protest songs that do nothing more than preach to a choir and push away the audience that the message is needing to reach.”

WHAT I LEARNED

Just as “you should love who you love” calls out those who would waste their own time and energy getting upset about someone else’s relationship, the same applies to getting upset over other peoples’ opinions about music. It’s easy to dismiss the music buying public as sheep who flock to whatever’s trending, but just because a particular song doesn’t speak to me doesn’t mean it can’t move someone else – such as Mrs. Bryan, who cried when she heard her son sing “Mamas ought to qualify for sainthood.” We all have unique life experiences that influence our opinions, perspectives and values.

If I got one takeaway from spending time listening more closely to “Most People Are Good” it’s that sometimes I need to give a songwriter the benefit of the doubt. Were Hill, Kear and Frasier just trying to make a quick buck? Maybe, maybe not. It’s not going to kill me to believe that they were coming from a place of honesty.

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